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Swedish Minister Annika Strandhäll Says the Country’s Elderly are the Problem and Not Refugees

Interesting body language exhibited by Swedish Social Affairs Minister Annika Strandhäll during her visit to Bergviken's elderly residence in Luleå. PHOTO: Lennart Jönsson/SocialDemokraterna.se

By Joshua Cullen | 29 April 2018

VOICE OF EUROPE — Sweden’s Minister of Social Affairs, Annika Strandhäll, told newspaper Aftonbladet that the country’s elderly and not refugees, are overloading the healthcare system.

The Swedish health care system is so overloaded that the care queues for surgery are so long that patients literally start to rot, Aftonbladet reported earlier.

Strandhäl is convinced this is not due to mass migration to Sweden. When readers of Aftonbladet claim that it is the acceptance of refugees that has made Swedish healthcare worse, the minister answers:

“That’s not true, that’s not true! We have a rapidly aging population in Sweden. Life expectancy increases by 3.5 hours a day and we have a larger number of chroniclers with life-long relationships with healthcare today than 30 years ago.”

According to Strandhäll, “the number of people aged 70 years and older will increase by 300,000 by 2025. That is the big problem, according to her. Refugee reception has nothing to do with it”.

 

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2 Comments on Swedish Minister Annika Strandhäll Says the Country’s Elderly are the Problem and Not Refugees

  1. How about all the victims from refugee mobs , grenades , beatings , rapes , abortions etc …

    Besides … what a nerve to take such an existential dump on the elders !!!

  2. >refugees

    PISA scores, a measure of academic aptitude and achievement, and thus a decent proxy for IQ, have been steadily trending down in Sweden for 20 years — link

    However if it’s concern about actual use of healthcare system resources, she’s probably correct: refugees are typically, on average, younger than natives, and they will take up less of the system’s capacity — probably the biggest burden will be childbirth, since muslims (and Africans) have significantly higher birthrates than natives (this is true throughout Europe).

    Most of the the healthcare burden from “refugees” is borne by people who pay premiums for health insurance — in European countries like Sweden, literally everyone is covered by normal health insurance (including those unemployed, on welfare, etc) — these systems are not ‘pay-as-you-go’; rather via monthly payments you have a contract to cover your (real and potential) healthcare needs — “refugees” are part of this system, but they don’t pay a monthly premium; someone else pays their premiums — the employed/insured who pay premiums, which in ‘progressive’ Europe is usually a percentage of your income, cover their costs/premiums via paying more for their own health insurance — these costs are generally fixed regardless of how much of the system’s capacity is used by the “refugees”.

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