News Ticker

LBJ Hitman ‘Mac’ Wallace’s Fingerprints Found in Texas Book Depository

In continuation of our series on assassins [see “William Joseph Bryan: Crime Syndicate Patsy, Set-Up Miastro Extraordinaire” and “The Shakespearean Tale of E. Howard Hunt’s JFK Assassination Confession“], Winter Watch now takes a look at Malcolm “Mac” Wallace (1921-1971), President Lyndon B. Johnson’s personal assassin.

Incredibly, it wasn’t until March 12, 1998, that a fingerprint of Wallace’s recorded in 1951 was positively matched with a copy of a fingerprint labeled “unknown” that investigators lifted on Nov. 22, 1963, from a shipping carton located near the southeast side of the sixth-floor window of the Texas School Book Depository building. The carton, labeled “Box A,” also contained several fingerprints identified as those of Lee Harvey Oswald.

The identification was made by A. Nathan Darby, a certified latent print examiner with several decades of experience. Darby is a member of the International Association of Identifiers and was chosen to help design the Eastman Kodak Miracode System of transmitting fingerprints between law enforcement agencies. Darby signed a sworn, notarized affidavit stating that he was able to affirm a 14-point match between the “Unknown” fingerprint and the “blind” print card submitted to him, which was the 1951 print of Wallace’s. U.S. law requires a 12-point match for legal identification, and Darby’s match is more conclusive than the legal minimum.

This Wallace fingerprint was forwarded to the FBI. The agency then declared it a non-match. Darby addressed this travesty in the video segment below.

Winter Watch Takeaway: Wallace may have been on the sixth floor of the Book Depository to set up the sniper’s nest framing of Oswald, not take shots, which was left to others operating in different locations, like the grassy knoll and Dal-Tex Building [see “John F. Kennedy’s Prescient Belief in Conspiracies and His Own Demise“].

Newly released JFK files now reveal that Oswald’s fingerprints that were said to be on his assassin’s rifle have since allegedly been “lost.”

A String of Murders Dating Back to 1951

Image result for "josefa johnson"
LBJ’s sister Josefa Johnson

Edward Clark introduced Mac Wallace to Lyndon B. Johnson in October, 1950, and he then began working with the United States Department of Agriculture in Texas.

Wallace was convicted for the October 22, 1951 murder of John Kinser. Through the influence of LBJ, he got off on a suspended five-year sentence. It was rumored that LBJ’s sister Josefa Johnson had affairs with both Kinser and Wallace. Kinser asked Josefa if she could arrange for her brother to loan him some money. Johnson interpreted this as a blackmail threat (Josefa had told Kinser about some of her brother’s corrupt activities).

According to Bill Adler of The Texas Observer, several of the jurors telephoned Kinser’s parents to apologize for agreeing to a “suspended sentence but said they did so only because threats had been made against their families.” The Austin Statesman wrote that the case was “marked from the start to finish by the unusual” and had left the people of Austin shocked and “quizzical.”

Primary view of object titled '[Mac Wallace hearing]'.
Oct. 25, 1951, bond hearing for Malcolm E. ‘Mac’ Wallace. He was accused of murdering golf pro Douglas Kinser at the Lamar Pitch n Putt. PHOTO: TexasHistory.unt.edu
Josefa was always problematic for LBJ. On Christmas morning in 1961, at the age of 49, she was found dead in her bed at her home at 3:15 a.m. The cause of death was stated to be a brain hemorrhage. Josefa had returned home at 11:45 p.m. from a Christmas Eve party at LBJ’s ranch. There was no autopsy and no inquest. The death certificate was executed by a doctor who was not present to examine the deceased. Josefa was embalmed that same day and buried the following, on Dec. 26.

According to Clint Peoples, a Texas Ranger based in Austin, Billie Sol Estes had promised to tell the full story of the death of Henry Marshall when he obtained his freedom from prison.

Allotments were issued telling the cotton farmers how much they could or could not plant. In 1958, Estes cut a deal with LBJ. Over the next couple of years, Estes ran a vast scam using federal agricultural subsidies. According to Estes, he obtained $21 million a year for “growing” and “storing” non-existent crops of cotton.

In 1960, Marshall, who was an agent of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, was asked to investigate the Estes’ activities. Marshall discovered that over a two-year period, Estes had purchased 3,200 acres of cotton allotments from 116 different farmers. LBJ was cut in on a take of the corruption. At one point, Estes was worth $400 million — in 1960s dollars.

True to his word, Estes testified that he, LBJ, LBJ’s aide Cliff Carter and Wallace met several times to discuss the issue of the “loose cannon,” Henry Marshall. Marshall had refused a LBJ-arranged promotion to Washington, D.C. headquarters, and they feared he was about to report them.

LBJ, according to Estes, on Jan. 17, 1961, finally said, “Get rid of him,” and Wallace was given the assignment. According to testimony, Wallace followed Marshall to a remote area of his farm and beat him nearly unconscious. Then, while trying to asphyxiate him with exhaust from Marshall’s pickup truck, Wallace thought he heard someone approaching the scene and hastily grabbed a rifle. Wallace pumped five shots into Marshall’s body and fled the scene.

The murder was ruled a suicide. No pictures were taken of the crime scene, no blood samples were taken of the stains on the truck — which was washed and waxed the following day — and no fingerprints were taken from the rifle or the pickup [source: Glen Sample and Mark Collum, “The Men On The Sixth Floor,” 1995].

David Hanners, of the Dallas Morning News reported on April, 4, 1984, that in his appearance before the grand jury, Estes testified that Robert Kennedy may have offered Marshall protection, if he would testify against LBJ, sources said.

By 1963, Bobby Kennedy called five of Washington’s top reporters into his office and told them it was now open season on LBJ. It’s okay, he told them, to go after the story they were ignoring out of deference to the administration. In the Senate, the investigation into the Bobby Baker case was moving quickly ahead. Even the Democrats were cooperating, thanks to the Kennedys, and an awful lot of really bad stuff was being revealed — until Nov. 22, 1963.

JFK’s secretary, Evelyn Lincoln, wrote that the day President Kennedy left for Dallas, they discussed the Bobby Baker scandal, LBJ’s deep involvement in it and the scandal’s potential affect on JFK’s campaign for a second term.

Kennedy told her, “I will need a running mate in ’64, a man who believes as I do.”

Lincoln wrote, “President Kennedy had talked and I had just listened, but I did venture one question. Now, I asked, ‘Who is your choice as a running mate?’ He looked straight ahead, and without hesitating, he replied, ‘At this time, I am thinking about Gov. Terry Sanford of North Carolina. BUT IT WILL NOT BE LYNDON.'”

Bobby Kennedy was later photographed and quoted as saying to a shocked-looking LBJ, “Why did you have my brother killed?”

I think he knew the answer.

As it turned out, on Aug. 9, 1984, Estes’ lawyer, Douglas Caddy, wrote to Stephen S. Trott at the U.S. Department of Justice. Caddy’s letter to Trott said, “Mr. Estes is willing to testify that LBJ ordered these killings, and that he transmitted his orders through Cliff Carter to Mac Wallace, who executed the murders.”

The letter continued:

Mr. Estes was a member of a four-member group, headed by Lyndon Johnson, which committed criminal acts in Texas in the 1960’s. The other two, besides Mr. Estes and LBJ, were Cliff Carter and Mac Wallace. Mr. Estes is willing to disclose his knowledge concerning the following criminal offenses:

1. The killing of Henry Marshall

2. The killing of George Krutilek

3. The killing of Ike Rogers and his secretary

4. The killing of Harold Orr

5. The killing of Coleman Wade

6. The killing of Josefa Johnson

7. The killing of John Kinser

8. The killing of President J. F. Kennedy.

Mr. Estes is willing to testify that LBJ ordered these killings, and that he transmitted his orders through Cliff Carter to Mac Wallace, who executed the murders. In the cases of murders nos. 1-7, Mr. Estes’ knowledge of the precise details concerning the way the murders were executed stems from conversations he had shortly after each event with Cliff Carter and Mac Wallace.

In addition, a short time after Mr. Estes was released from prison in 1971, he met with Cliff Carter and they reminisced about what had occurred in the past, including the murders. During their conversation, Carter orally compiled a list of 17 murders which had been committed, some of which Mr. Estes was unfamiliar. A living witness was present at that meeting and should be willing to testify about it. He is Kyle Brown, recently of Houston and now living in Brady, Texas.

Mr. Estes, states that Mac Wallace, whom he describes as a “stone killer” with a communist background, recruited Jack Ruby, who in turn recruited Lee Harvey Oswald.

Mr. Estes says that the Mafia did not participate in the Kennedy assassination, but that its participation was discussed prior to the event but rejected by LBJ, who believed if the Mafia were involved, he would never be out from under its blackmail.

Winter Watch Note: E. Howard Hunt stated that CIA operatives were utilized as well. Hunt also said that domestic Mafia was not a preferred method for domestic political assassinations.

Wallace’s favored method as a hit man was carbon monoxide poisoning.

On the night of April 4, 1962, at the western-end of Texas, a ranchman came upon the body of George Krutilek slumped in his car with a hose from his exhaust stuck in the window. Krutilek was a 49-year-old certified public accountant who had undergone secret grilling by FBI agents on April 2, the day after Billie Sol Estes’ arrest. Krutilek had worked for Estes and had been the recipient of his favors, but he was never seen or heard of again after the FBI grilling until his badly decomposed body was found. [Source: J. Evetts Haley, “A Texan Looks at Lyndon,” 1964]

In addition, other key witnesses in Estes’ cases — including Harold Orr and Howard Pratt — all died of carbon monoxide poisoning from car engines. Wallace himself was killed in a suspicious automobile accident in 1971. LBJ died in 1973.

Later, on June 19, 1992, U.S. Marshall Clint Peoples told a friend that he had documented evidence that Wallace was one of the shooters in Dealey Plaza. This would have been Estes’ sealed testimony given before a Robertson County grand jury in 1984. On June 23, Peoples, a former Texas Ranger, was killed in a mysterious one-car automobile accident in Texas.

Barr McClellan, was a full partner at the Austin, Texas, legal firm Clark, Thomas & Winters, which represented the interests of LBJ. McClellan is the father of former White House Press Secretary Scott McClellan and U.S. Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Mark McClellan. In 2003, McClellan published “Blood Money and Power: How L.B.J. Killed JFK.” In the book, he argues that LBJ and Edward Clark were involved in the planning and cover up of the assassination of JFK. McClellan also named Wallace as one of the assassins.

Barr was smeared and his book trashed by the mockingbird media, although a copy of a documentary on LBJ’s role can be found online and is linked below. This would never be shown today, and I’m very surprised it’s still up on YouTube.

Of course, Wallace’s hit list doesn’t include the unusual deaths of scores of JFK assassination eyewitnesses or those involved in the murdering the president. Richard Belzer in “Hit List” identifies 18 material witnesses who died within three years of Dealey Plaza. An actuary engaged by the London Times calculated the likelihood of 18 witnesses of their ages dying of any cause within three years of JFK’s assassination as 1 in 100,000 trillion.

19 Comments on LBJ Hitman ‘Mac’ Wallace’s Fingerprints Found in Texas Book Depository

  1. This is a major rebuttal of the LBJ theory. Still doesn’t explain how the absurd conventional narrative was concocted when LBJ ran the country. Further I am not aware of anybody advancing the “LBJ did it alone theory.” He would have to have had allies. Hunt would not have known every particular or every party to the Big Event as he met with a smaller compartmentalized group. I do however find the big gathering of honchos at the mansion of Clint Murchison the night before a dubious story.
    https://kennedysandking.com/john-f-kennedy-articles/evaluating-the-case-against-lyndon-johnson

    • A murder of this magnitude would not have been carried out by just one aggrieved person or group. Rather, it would have involved a compartmentalized effort from deep Inside the CIA, FBI, Secret Service, Organized Crime, LBJ’s inner circle, the Dallas PD and military intelligence. Also I’m sure heads of major families like The Rockefeller’s would have had to sign off.
      I am convinced to this day Chicago’s contribution was Chuckie Nicoletti and James Files. Who knows what other shooters were in place and stood down after the fatal head shot, which I believe was fired by James Files from the grassy knoll.
      We may never know the truth but whatever it is, it was well planned and had many back up plans if things went wrong.
      I’m convinced to this day the brains of the operation was Allen Dulles.

        • George Bush is the main component in the planning and execution and signed the bill to hold the records in 82 when he was president. He was at the eve of the assassination’s of JFK. Bush was with the CIA in the 50s and always worked in the shadows, I think he also tried to do Reagan while he was vice president

  2. Fascinating article on Unz by Laurent Guyénot, pointing out that US President Lyndon B Johnson was apparently legally Jewish … Guyénot suggests that Johnson and Jewish interests conducted the whole horrifying genocidal war in Vietnam, to distract from the Israeli wars and occupation in Palestine … From ‘Our First Jewish President’ in the ‘5 Towns Jewish Times’ – & here a photo of young LBJ in Texas: https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/3a3d339a6886b1257ce4a8aa5d7c109dfdcea67abbde32e57aae58117ee8e7bf.jpg

    Lyndon Johnson’s maternal ancestors, the Huffmans, apparently migrated from Germany sometime in the mid-eighteenth century.

    Both of Lyndon Johnson’s great-grandparents, on the maternal side, were Jewish. The line of Jewish mothers can be traced back three generations in Lyndon Johnson’s family tree. There is little doubt that he was Jewish.

    Congressman Johnson used legal and sometimes illegal methods to smuggle “hundreds of Jews into Texas, using Galveston as the entry port”

    Johnson then raised a very “substantial sum for arms for Jewish underground fighters in Palestine”

    while serving in the Senate, Johnson blocked the Eisenhower administration’s attempts to apply sanctions against Israel following the 1956 Sinai Campaign

    Johnson’s closest advisers were several strong pro-Israel advocates, including Benjamin Cohen and Abe Fortas

    • The above-cited article by Laurent Guyénot, also points out that French Président Charles de Gaulle was removed from power after criticising Israel and its aggression in Palestine

      French President Charles de Gaulle actually understood that the Vietnam War was preventing a peaceful solution in Palestine. In a press conference on November 27, 1967, after condemning Israel’s aggression and famously qualifying the Jews as “an elite people, self-confident and dominating,” de Gaulle called for the four great powers to enforce an international settlement on the basis of Israel’s withdrawal from the occupied territories

      Soon after that press conference, De Gaulle’s government became the target of a major student protest, led by predominantly Jewish Trotskyist activists, that culminated in May 1968, ultimately forcing De Gaulle to resign.

    • The Johnsons also owned stock in Bell Helicopter during the war, profiting from it. As a native Texan I’ve read extensively on this crooked family (one of many).

  3. What about the tension between Kennedy and Gurion? Also what about executive order 11110? Lyndon B. Johnson’s motivations may have included more than was revealed in the ‘Men who killed Kennedy’ part 9 video.

  4. I’m partial to the Mathis theory that the entire assassination story was scripted theater. Instead of a hero, JFK was an entrenched deep state player who in reality couldn’t give a rat’s ass about the little people. Also lots of evidence now that he was gay, which calls into question pretty much everything we thought we knew about him. Jackie and Marylyn? Probably just two of his many beards.

    • I agree, JFK was more a traitor than a hero(see The Arms Control and Disarmament Act of 1961, 22 U.S.C. § 2551).
      One picture did it for me, the one where they had Jackie stay in her pink dress for 24 hours. This dress would have been bathed in blood if JFK had just had his head blown almost clean off and Jackie held him to her breast as they sped to Parkland.
      https://static01.nyt.com/images/2013/11/15/us/JP-PINK/JP-PINK-blog427.jpg

      • BOOM!
        I worked in a casualty department and we got every kind of wound and what you state is 100% correct. And the smell of blood & brain matter would make you puke.

        Remember!
        RFK covered up the murder of Henry Marshall

        REMEMBER THE “SUICIDE” OF HENRY MARSHALL IN DALLAS, TEXAS?
        They said he committed suicide with a BOLT-ACTION RIFLE, shooting himself 5 TIMES!
        On 3rd June, 1961, Marshall was found dead on his farm by the side of his Chevy Fleetside pickup truck. His rifle lay beside him. He had been shot five times with his own rifle. Soon after County Sheriff Howard Stegall arrived, he decreed that Marshall had committed suicide. No pictures were taken of the crime scene, no blood samples were taken of the stains on the truck (the truck was washed and waxed the following day), no check for fingerprints were made on the rifle or pickup.

        Marshall’s wife (Sybil Marshall) and brother (Robert Marshall) refused to believe he had committed suicide and posted a $2,000 reward for information leading to a murder conviction. The undertaker, Manley Jones, also reported: “To me it looked like murder. I just do not believe a man could shoot himself like that.” The undertaker’s son, Raymond Jones, later told the journalist, Bill Adler in 1986:

        “Daddy said he told Judge Farmer there was no way Mr. Marshall could have killed himself. Daddy had seen suicides before. JPs depend on us and our judgments about such things. we see a lot more deaths than they do. But in this case, Daddy said, Judge Farmer told him he was going to put suicide on the death certificate because the sheriff told him to.”

        As a result, Lee Farmer returned a suicide verdict: “death by gunshot, self-inflicted.”

        Sybil Marshall hired an attorney, W. S. Barron, in order to persuade the Robertson County authorities to change the ruling on Marshall’s cause of death. One man who did believe that Marshall had been murdered was Texas Ranger Clint Peoples. He had reported to Colonel Homer Garrison, director of the Texas Department of Public Safety, that it “would have been utterly impossible for Mr. Marshall to have taken his own life.”

        Peoples also interviewed Nolan Griffin, a gas station attendant in Robertson County. Griffin claimed that on the day of Marshall’s death, he had been asked by a stranger for directions to Marshall’s farm. A Texas Ranger artist, Thadd Johnson, drew a facial sketch based on a description given by Griffin. Peoples eventually came to the conclusion that this man was Mac Wallace, the convicted murderer of John Kinser.
        Mac Wallace was LBJ’s hitman!

        Did LBJ order the killing of Henry Marshall?

        Henry Marshall, the son of a farmer, was born in Robertson County, Texas, in 1909. He studied chemistry at the University of Texas before becoming the only teacher at the Nesbitt Rural School. The school was forced to close in May, 1932, a victim of the Great Depression.

        Marshall managed to find work at a Franklin gin company. However, in August, 1934, Marshall became a clerk with the Agricultural Adjustment Administration (AAA). He worked at the agency’s Robertson County office. Marshall was a good worker and it eventually held a senior post in the agency.

        In 1960 Marshall was asked to investigate the activities of Billie Sol Estes. Marshall discovered that over a two year period, Estes had purchased 3,200 acres of cotton allotments from 116 different farmers. Marshall wrote to his superiors in Washington on 31st August, 1960, that: “The regulations should be strengthened to support our disapproval of every case (of allotment transfers)”.

        When he heard the news, Billie Sol Estes sent his lawyer, John P. Dennison, to meet Marshall in Robertson County. At the meeting on 17th January, 1961, Marshall told Dennison that Estes was clearly involved in a “scheme or device to buy allotments, and will not be approved, and prosecution will follow if this operation is ever used.”

        Marshall was disturbed that as a result of sending a report of his meeting to Washington, he was offered a new post in Washington. He assumed that Bille Sol Estes had friends in high places and that they wanted him removed from the field office in Robertson County. Marshall refused what he considered to be a bribe.

        A week after the meeting between Marshall and Dennison, A. B. Foster, manager of Billie Sol Enterprises, wrote to Cliff Carter, a close aide to Lyndon B. Johnson, telling him about the problems that Marshall was causing the company. Foster wrote that “we would sincerely appreciate your investigating this and seeing if anything can be done.”
        Over the next few months Marshall had meetings with eleven county committees in Texas. He pointed out that Billie Sol Estes scheme to buy cotton allotments were illegal. This information was then communicated to those farmers who had been sold their cotton allotments to Billie Sol Enterprises.

        On 3rd June, 1961, Marshall was found dead on his farm by the side of his Chevy Fleetside pickup truck. His rifle lay beside him. He had been shot five times with his own rifle. Soon after County Sheriff Howard Stegall arrived, he decreed that Marshall had committed suicide. No pictures were taken of the crime scene, no blood samples were taken of the stains on the truck (the truck was washed and waxed the following day), no check for fingerprints were made on the rifle or pickup.

        Marshall’s wife (Sybil Marshall) and brother (Robert Marshall) refused to believe he had committed suicide and posted a $2,000 reward for information leading to a murder conviction. The undertaker, Manley Jones, also reported: “To me it looked like murder. I just do not believe a man could shoot himself like that.” The undertaker’s son, Raymond Jones, later told the journalist, Bill Adler in 1986: “Daddy said he told Judge Farmer there was no way Mr. Marshall could have killed himself. Daddy had seen suicides before. JPs depend on us and our judgments about such things. we see a lot more deaths than they do. But in this case, Daddy said, Judge Farmer told him he was going to put suicide on the death certificate because the sheriff told him to.” As a result, Lee Farmer returned a suicide verdict: “death by gunshot, self-inflicted.”

        Sybil Marshall hired an attorney, W. S. Barron, in order to persuade the Robertson County authorities to change the ruling on Marshall’s cause of death. One man who did believe that Marshall had been murdered was Texas Ranger Clint Peoples. He had reported to Colonel Homer Garrison, director of the Texas Department of Public Safety, that it “would have been utterly impossible for Mr. Marshall to have taken his own life.”
        Peoples also interviewed Nolan Griffin, a gas station attendant in Robertson County. Griffin claimed that on the day of Marshall’s death, he had been asked by a stranger for directions to Marshall’s farm. A Texas Ranger artist, Thadd Johnson, drew a facial sketch based on a description given by Griffin. Peoples eventually came to the conclusion that this man was Mac Wallace, the convicted murderer of John Kinser.

        In the spring of 1962, Bille Sol Estes was arrested by the FBI on fraud and conspiracy charges. Soon afterwards it was disclosed by the Secretary of Agriculture, Orville L. Freeman, that Henry Marshall had been a key figure in the investigation into the illegal activities of Billie Sol Estes. As a result, the Robertson County grand jury ordered that the body of Marshall should be exhumed and an autopsy performed. After eight hours of examination, Dr. Joseph A. Jachimczyk confirmed that Marshall had not committed suicide. Jachimczyk also discovered a 15 percent carbon monoxide concentration in Marshall’s body. Jachimczyk calculated that it could have been as high as 30 percent at the time of death.

        On 4th April, 1962, George Krutilek, Estes chief accountant, was found dead. Despite a severe bruise on Krutilek’s head, the coroner decided that he had also committed suicide. The next day, Estes, and three business associates, were indicted by a federal grand jury on 57 counts of fraud. Two of these men, Harold Orr and Coleman Wade, died before the case came to court. At the time it was said they committed suicide but later Estes was to claim that both men were murdered by Mac Wallace in order to protect the political career of Lyndon B. Johnson.

        The Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations also began to look into the case of Billie Sol Estes. Leonard C. Williams, a former assistant to Henry Marshall, testified about the evidence the department acquired against Estes. Secretary of Agriculture Orville Freeman also admitted that Marshall was a man “who left this world under questioned circumstances.”

        It was eventually discovered that three officials of the Agricultural Adjustment Administration in Washington had received bribes from Billie Sol Estes. Red Jacobs, Jim Ralph and Bill Morris were eventually removed from their jobs. However, further disclosures suggested that Orville L. Freeman, might be involved in the scam. In September, 1961, Billie Sol Estes had been fined $42,000 for illegal cotton allotments. Two months later, Freeman appointed Estes to the National Cotton Advisory Board.
        It was also revealed that Billie Sol Estes told Wilson C. Tucker, deputy director of the Agriculture Department’s cotton division, on 1st August, 1961, that he threatened to “embarrass the Kennedy administration if the investigation were not halted”. Tucker went onto testify: “Estes stated that this pooled cotton allotment matter had caused the death of one person and then asked me if I knew Henry Marshall”. As Tucker pointed out, this was six months before questions about Marshall’s death had been raised publicly.

        However, the cover-up continued. Tommy G. McWilliams, the FBI agent in charge of the Henry Marshall investigation, came to the conclusion that Marshall had indeed committed suicide. He wrote: “My theory was that he shot himself and then realized he wasn’t dead.” He then claimed that he then tried to kill himself by inhaling carbon monoxide from the exhaust pipe of his truck. McWilliams claimed that Marshall had used his shirt to make a hood over the exhaust pipe. Even J. Edgar Hoover was not impressed with this theory. He wrote on 21st May, 1962: “I just can’t understand how one can fire five shots at himself.”

        Dr. Joseph A. Jachimczyk also disagreed with the FBI report. He believed that the bruise on Marshall’s forehead had been caused by a “severe blow to the head”. Jachimczyk also rejected the idea that Marshall had used his shirt as a hood. He pointed out that “if this were done, soot must have necessarily been found on the shirt; no such was found.”

        The Robertson County grand jury continued to investigate the death of Henry Marshall. However, some observers were disturbed by the news that grand jury member, Pryse Metcalfe, was dominating proceedings. Metcalfe was County Sheriff Howard Stegall’s son-in-law.

        On 1st June, 1962, the Dallas News reported that President John F. Kennedy had “taken a personal interest in the mysterious death of Henry Marshall.” As a result, the story said, Robert Kennedy “has ordered the FBI to step up its investigation of the case.”

        In June, 1962, Billie Sol Estes, appeared before the grand jury. He was accompanied by John Cofer, a lawyer who represented Lyndon B. Johnson when he was accused of ballot-rigging when elected to the Senate in 1948 and Mac Wallace when he was charged with the murder of John Kinser. Billie Sol Estes spent almost two hours before the grand jury, but he invoked the Texas version of the Fifth Amendment and refused to answer most questions on grounds that he might incriminate himself.
        Tommy G. McWilliams of the FBI also appeared before the grand jury and put forward the theory that Henry Wallace had committed suicide. Dr. Joseph A. Jachimczyk also testified that “if in fact this is a suicide, it is the most unusual one I have seen during the examination of approximately 15,000 deceased persons.”
        McWilliams did admit that it was “hard to kill yourself with a bolt-action 22”. This view was shared by John McClellan, a member of the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. He posed for photographs with a .22 caliber rifle similar to Marshall’s. McClellan pointed out:

        “It doesn’t take many deductions to come to the irrevocable conclusion that no man committed suicide by placing the rifle in that awkward position and then (cocking) it four times more.”

        Despite the evidence presented by Jachimczyk, the grand jury agreed with McWilliams. It ruled that after considering all the known evidence, the jury considers it “inconclusive to substantiate a definite decision at this time, or to overrule any decision heretofore made.” Later, it was disclosed that some jury members believed that Marshall had been murdered. Ralph McKinney blamed Pryse Metcalfe for this decision.

        “Pryse was as strong in the support of the suicide verdict as anyone I have ever seen in my life, and I think he used every influence he possibly could against the members of the grand jury to be sure it came out with a suicide verdict.”

        In 1964 the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations reported that it could find no link between Marshall’s death and his efforts to bring to an end Billie Sol Estes’ cotton allotment scheme. The following year Estes went to prison for fraud relating to the mostly non-existent fertilizer tanks he had put up for collateral as part of the cotton allotment scam. He was released in 1971 but he was later sent back to prison for mail fraud and non-payment of income tax.

        Clint Peoples retired from the Texas Rangers in 1974 but he continued to investigate the murder of Henry Marshall. In 1979 Peoples interviewed Billie Sol Estes in prison. Estes promised that “when he was released he would solve the puzzle of Henry Marshall’s death”.

        Billie Sol Estes was released from prison in December, 1983. Three months later he appeared before the Robertson County grand jury. He confessed that Henry Marshall was murdered because it was feared he would “blow the whistle” on the cotton allotment scam. Billie Sol Estes claimed that Marshall was murdered on the orders of Lyndon B. Johnson, who was afraid that his own role in this scam would become public knowledge. According to Estes, Clifton C. Carter, Johnson’s long-term aide, had ordered Marshall to approve 138 cotton allotment transfers.

        Of course, the authorities have never re-investigated the Henry Marshall case. In fact, attempts have been made to prevent these charges entering the public domain (see the way the television documentary on LBJ was banned).

        I believe that Henry Marshall’s death is linked to the assassination of JFK. Remember, in 1963, the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations were still investigating the Henry Marshall case. We also know that JFK and RFK were taking a close interest in the case. The Marshall murder was only one of three Senate investigations that was linking LBJ with serious crimes. Bobby Baker and the TFX contract were also being investigated in 1963. When LBJ became president he was able to control the reports that came out of these investigations.

        Billie Sol Estes told the grand jury that he had a meeting with Johnson and Carter about Henry Marshall. Johnson suggested that Marshall be promoted out of Texas. Estes agreed and replied:
        “Let’s transfer him, let’s get him out of here. Get him a better job, make him an assistant secretary of agriculture.” However, Marshall rejected the idea of being promoted in order to keep him quiet.

        Estes, Johnson and Carter had another meeting on 17th January, 1961, to discuss what to do about Henry Marshall. Also at the meeting was Malcolm Wallace. After it was pointed out that Marshall had refused promotion to Washington, Johnson said:

        “It looks like we’ll just have to get rid of him.”

        Mac Wallace, who Estes described as a hitman, was given the assignment.
        Billie Sol Estes also told the grand jury that he met Carter and Wallace at his home in Pecos after Marshall was killed. Wallace described how he waited for Marshall at his farm. He planned to kill him and make it appear as if Marshall committed suicide by carbon monoxide poisoning. However, Marshall fought back and he was forced to shoot him with his own rifle. He quoted Carter as saying that Wallace “sure did botch it up.” Johnson was now forced to use his influence to get the authorities in Texas to cover-up the murder.

        The grand jury rejected the testimony of Billie Sol Estes. Carter, Wallace and Johnson were all dead and could not confirm Billie Sol’s testimony. However, the Grand Jury did change the verdict on the death of Henry Marshall from suicide to death by gunshot.

        On 9th August, 1984, Estes’ lawyer, Douglas Caddy, wrote to Stephen S. Trott at the U.S. Department of Justice. In the letter Caddy claimed that Estes, Lyndon B. Johnson, Malcolm (Mac) Wallace and Cliff Carter had been involved in the murders of Henry Marshall, George Krutilek, Harold Orr, Ike Rogers, Coleman Wade, Josefa Johnson, John Kinser and John F. Kennedy. Caddy added:

        “Mr. Estes is willing to testify that LBJ ordered these killings, and that he transmitted his orders through Cliff Carter to Mac Wallace, who executed the murders.”

        Four days later, the Texas Bureau of Vital Statistics ruled that there was now “clear and convincing” evidence to prove Henry Marshall was murdered and State District Judge Peter Lowry ordered that the death certificate should be changed to “homicide by gunshot wounds”.

        Texas Ranger Clint Peoples interviewed Nolan Griffin, a gas station attendant in Robertson County. Griffin claimed that on the day of Marshall’s death, he had been asked by a stranger for directions to Marshall’s farm. A Texas Ranger artist, Thadd Johnson, drew a facial sketch based on a description given by Griffin. Peoples eventually came to the conclusion that this man was Mac Wallace.

        THE MURDER OF CLINT PEOPLES
        December 1, 2020

        (Excerpted from LBJ: From Mastermind to The Colossus)
        Though he Outlived LBJ by 20 years, Marshal Peoples’ Persistence in “Outing” Johnson Finally Caught Up with Him: Who Ordered the Kill?

        By 1992, Clint Peoples, previously a captain in the Texas Rangers, had become a US Marshal. As he continued his investigation of the Henry Marshall murder he discovered explosive new evidence that a previously unidentified fingerprint found on a box in the “sniper’s nest” on the afternoon of the John Kennedy assassination was a match to the 1951 fingerprint of Malcolm Wallace, Lyndon Johnson’s hit man. Marshal Peoples planned to announce this finding at a press conference and intended to explain to the world the significance of this finding and how it proved Johnson’s involvement in the assassination.

        By this point, Lyndon had been dead for nearly twenty years, yet his deadly reach was still very much still functioning. He had placed different aides in key positions around the country with the understanding that their long-term mission was to protect his image, reputation and “legacy.”

        In the case of Clint Peoples, who had been the bane of their existence for as long as they could remember, the plan to finally shut him up would have been an adaptation of one of their “off the shelf” methods of a guaranteed “accident.” But in this case the event was inadvertently witnessed by someone who instinctively, and immediately, knew that what she saw put herself in jeopardy, as another person who knew too much and was thus afraid to show herself publicly.

        Marshal Peoples’ Secretary Discovered He Was Murdered.

        Clint Peoples’ assistant, a lady named “Georgia,” decided to cooperate with French researcher William Reymond for his 2003 French book and video referenced previously, though she was clearly scared of publicity and refused to allow her full name to be revealed.

        NOTE: Due to popular demand, an entire chapter of Reymond’s book — relating to Georgia’s testimony — was translated from the original French to English and printed “side by side” in the January 14, 2021 blog here: “More Evidence Revealed of Clint Peoples’ Murder: The Testimony of His Secretary Georgia” https://wordpress.com/post/lbjthemasterofdeceit.com/4183

        As the interview progressed, she proceeded to make a startling statement about the purported automobile “accident” that took Clint Peoples’ life just a few days before he planned to conduct a press conference announcing his discovery of Mac Wallace’s fingerprint. She stated that when she went to the funeral home for the viewing, a woman came up to her and told her not to tell anyone else, but that she had witnessed the entire incident; she said it was no “accident,” because Clint’s car was pushed off the road from behind by a “big red truck” and the weather was clear, the road was dry. The driver of the truck did it intentionally, she said, and then left the scene. [1]

        Georgia continued the interview, admitting that she was too afraid to go look at the car in the salvage yard to see if the back bumper showed any evidence of being scratched or dented by the red truck. She ended her statement by saying she didn’t want to get involved in it, because, “Too many people have been killed.” [2]

        The discovery of the fingerprint that Peoples intended to announce at the press conference apparently was acquired subsequently by the late Austin, Texas researcher J. Harrison, whose records were given to Walt Brown; Brown announced the finding in 1998 after the analysis was certified by Nathan Darby, a fingerprint expert retired from the Austin police department. Some researchers, whose objectives may be influenced by ulterior motives, have questioned the competence of the late Nathan Darby, stating on certain internet venues that he “wasn’t certified.” [This text was written before Joan Mellen made the same claim in her 2016 book Faustian Bargains, which has since been discredited by Richard Bartholomew and further debunked by David Denton]. [3]

        However, as Barr McClellan took the time in his book to demonstrate, Travis County district judges Mace B. Thurman Jr. and Tom Blackwell, in recommending Mr. Darby for certification as a fingerprint expert in 1978, stated that he had testified in their courts “numerous times” and “With his vast experience in fingerprints, there has never been a question as to whether he could qualify to testify as an expert. . . . I sincerely feel that he should be certified as a fingerprint expert.” He was subsequently given the honor of being certified by the International Association for Identification on November 6, 1978.[4]

        Evidently, some people believe that once such a person retires from their profession, their knowledge immediately stops and such certifications are declared null and void. Such profound analysis takes the concept of “critical thinking” skills to new (albeit lower) levels.

        Nathan Darby’s expert opinion on that fingerprint was that it matched that of Mac Wallace on at least thirty-four points; according to the statements proffered on the video “The Guilty Men” (Part 9 of the series The Men Who Killed Kennedy), matching only six points can be sufficient for conviction. Mr. Darby’s part of the video can be found on many internet web sites, including the video “The Guilty Men.” This video was immediately banned from further rebroadcasts by The History Channel after being attacked by Johnson’s ex-sycophants.

        Though this segment is now well known to many researchers, as well as the many viewers of it since it first aired in 2003, it was stunning news at that time; eleven years earlier, in 1992 just as the movie JFK was being promoted, it would have been even more shocking, and certain people did not want the persistent Clint Peoples to make this finding public. Based upon this eyewitness testimony and the most elemental “common sense” intuition of most rational and objective observers, it is hard to deny the probability that someone ordered Mr. Peoples eliminated by “extreme prejudice.” If the testimony of this eye witness is true—a conclusion that is really the only realistic explanation, with the possible exception that the pickup driver who ran him off the road was just another drunken redneck (which does evoke images of the ghost of Lyndon Johnson himself)—the only plausible explanation is that LBJ’s unknown secret “protectors” made a decision that was identical to Johnson’s when he ordered the murder of Henry Marshall back in 1961: “He’s got to go.”

        It is the totality of all the anomalies identified throughout [the book]— from the original, absurd and outrageous 1961 finding of “suicide” in the case of Henry Marshall, to the stacking of the 1962 grand jury by Sheriff Howard Stegall, and Barefoot Sanders’s cross-jurisdictional involvement in that jury for the purpose of evidence censorship and jury manipulation—that explains why Johnson was so desperate: He went to such great lengths for the singular purpose of keeping the cause of death of Henry Marshall a “suicide.” His maneuver obviously worked because it impeded Captain Peoples’ investigation and bought Johnson enough time to live another decade and complete his dream of becoming president. Justice would eventually come for Henry Marshall’s family, but it would not be in time to save John F. Kennedy and thousands of other Americans. And the untold millions of people in other parts of the world.

        [Amended for the Blog: Given what we know about the long-term feud between Clint Peoples and his nemesis, Federal Judge Barefoot Sanders — who, until he died in 2008, was still protecting the tainted “legacy” of Lyndon Johnson as his loyal sycophant decades after Johnson died, as detailed here — it puts Sanders at the top of the list of “most likely suspects” for who ordered that hit].

        END NOTES

        [1] Reymond, William, and Billie Sol Estes, JFK le Dernier Témoin: Assassinat de Kennedy, enfin la vérité. Paris, Flammarion, 2003, pp. 282–283 and referenced in the English version of an untitled video shown at The Conspiracy Museum, Nov. 2003 (Produced by William Reymond and Tom Bowden, with Billie Sol Estes). That English-spoken original video was embedded into a widely distributed French film titled “JFK—Autopsie d’un complot [Autopsy of a conspiracy]—John Fitzgerald Kennedy” that emerged about the same time as Reymond’s book (2003). It was also done only in French and sold for a short period on the internet before disappearing until November, 2014, when it reappeared for free viewing on the website Dailymotion.com (see here).

        [2] Ibid.

        [3] Mellen’s claims were first thoroughly discredited by Richard Bartholomew in Chapter 17 of his 2018 book The Deep State in the Heart of Texas, and again further rebutted by David Denton in his 2019 essay Nexus Redux, republished in 2020 within his book Essays on The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy under the subtitle, “Joan Mellen Did Not Debunk the Idea of LBJ’s Complicity in the Murder of JFK”.

        [4] McClellan, Barr, Blood, Money & Power—How LBJ Killed JFK. New York: Hannover House, 2003, Exhibit G (pp. 6–7 of 10)

  5. Lee Oswald was probably working as a double agent mole for RFK. He had both the New Orleans and mob connections and I believe Bobby knew an assassination was possible but believed that threat would come from the Cuban Exile community. I don’t think he ever considered that elements within our own government would dare kill a sitting President.

    Here is a great link Coaxing out more details …

    http://doctormarysmonkey.com/more/endnotes/DMM%20CH%2016%20%20Epilogue%20end%20notes.pdf

    It makes sense that immediately after the assassination, the perps needed to buy time enough to tie up loose ends until LBJ could lock things down formally back in DC. Framing Bobby’s mole would have “checkmated” RFK long enough to kill Oswald and posthumously frame him.

  6. Another strong piece of evidence relating to Johnson’s jewishness was his cover up of the USS Liberty Israeli attack that killed 34 American sailors. Managing the cover up was Admiral McCain, the father of the late senator John McCain.

    • There is rather convincing evidence that 1) the ‘chain of custody’ of the Zapruder film was not what was assumed at the time, and 2) it was altered — see the following presentations featuring Doug Horne, who investigated the Zapruder film for the ARRB:

      Midnight Writer News Episode 107 — Douglas Horne on the Zapruder Film Alteration Debate

      Shane O’Sullivan’s film The Zapruder Film Mystery.

      And Zapruder was a M.O.T…imagine that…

      There is no evidence I know of that Zapruder himself had anything to do with the (apparent) manipulation of his film — his interest was more pecuniary, i.e. he was ready and willing to sell it and any/all rights to it.

      Note: The rights to the film were returned to the Zapruder family in the 1970s (after it was aired publicly/on TV by Geraldo Rivera, who got a bootleg copy from Robert Groden) — the Zapruder family later received $16m for the film/all rights to it when it was deemed an essential assassination record due to the work of the ARRB (link).

  7. I was afraid this whole subject had gone dead. I’m familiar with most of the material cited, but it’s good it see the references and rumors gathered into one place, along with the Mac Wallace update. Thanks.

  8. Doug Horne, who worked for the ARRB, is, in my opinion, the best of the latter day JFK researchers (he is largely retired now) — in this long (> 6 hrs) video summarizing his findings/books, he reveals that the KGB conducted its own investigation into the JFK assassination, and concluded that LBJ was behind it — the FBI had bugged the Soviet consulate in NYC, and was able to eavesdrop when KGB officers came and secretly briefed Soviet intelligence people connected to the consulate about the findings of the KGB’s own JFK investigation — Hoover later summarized the transcript of this KGB briefing in a memo to LBJ.

Post a Comment

Winter Watch
%d bloggers like this: