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When Pigs Fly: Hurricane Florence’s Rendezvous with Carolina Hog Farms Won’t Be Pretty

Workers float dead pigs through Hurricane Floyd floodwaters at Rabon Maready’s hog farm near Beulaville, North Carolina, Sept. 24, 1999. Floodwaters from Floyd killed thousands of hogs and triggered several waste spills. Hurricane Florence threatens to cause even more spills and pollution problems in the Carolinas. PHOTO: McClatchy DC/Alan Marler/AP

Could Hurricane Florence be the perfectly timed Big Butterfly/Flying Pig event to topple the smoke-and-mirrors U.S. economy? Could the Fed delay its Sept. 26 rate hike, triggering a large retreat in the dollar and an inflation spike? Or, could they go ahead with the rate hike, pulling support at a crucial moment? Will there be a North Carolina hog and chicken production collapse and inflationary price spike on key meat and poultry staples?  Steve Troxler, North Carolina agriculture commissioner, said earlier this week that Hurricane Florence could threaten a severe economic loss of livestock, poultry and crops. Will the emergency cleanup and recovery funds required accelerate an approaching fiscal train wreck?

Hurricane winds could linger for 24 to 48 hours, sweeping away trees and power lines while dumping 20 to 30 inches of rain in coastal areas, the National Hurricane Center said. Isolated totals of 40 inches are possible. Power will be lost for 3 million. The entire state will be soaked with double digit rain totals.

Ryan Maue, a Weather.us meteorologist says Florence is forecast to dump about 10 trillion gallons of water on the Carolinas.

The mammoth, Category 3 storm was expected to reach the Carolinas overnight Thursday.

A hog-waste environmental disaster is a given. North Carolina is one of the biggest hog-farming states in the U.S., with about 10 million pigs being raised on some 2,300 industrial-scale farms. That equals more than 10 billion pounds of wet animal waste, according to the Waterkeeper Alliance. These are also known as factory farms.

The hogs are typically housed in long metal sheds with grated floors designed to allow the animals’ urine and feces to fall through and flow into nearby open-air pits containing millions of gallons of untreated sewage.

In most natural disasters, the state doesn’t hold farmers liable for the water quality violations. In terms of chicken farms, the state of North Carolina doesn’t always know where poultry farms are located, because they’re not required to apply for a permit.

Floodwaters that come in contact with hog and chicken feces and dead carcasses make for a toxic soup and raises fears about the potential for bacteria to contaminate North Carolina’s groundwater. Pigs can drown in a foot of water.

Andy Curliss, the CEO of the North Carolina Pork Council, told Bloomberg that lagoons can handle as much as 25 inches (64 centimeters) of rain without failing.

“If we get more than 25 inches of rain, then we’ll start to be concerned,” he said.

The reality is that if water is moving from wind and flood in this low-lying inundated region, unimaginable amounts of manure will seep and be upchucked out of the lagoons and surrounding flooded manure covered fields. Flash flood warnings prevail all over the state.

“Damaging hurricane-force winds are likely along portions of the coasts of South Carolina and North Carolina,” the National Hurricane Center said. “Damaging winds could also spread well inland into portions of the Carolinas and Virginia.”

During Hurricane Floyd in 1999, those lagoons broke open and dumped waste into public waters, an environmental catastrophe that was later blamed for algal blooms and fish kills. During Hurricane Matthew in 2016, 14 lagoons flooded as shown in the photo above and millions of animals died. Yet in a blog post admonishing readers to “beware of misleading narratives and check facts,” the North Carolina Pork Council argued that the vast majority of lagoons operated as advertised during Matthew.

The lagoon berms in spots will breach as shown below. It seems disingenuous to say most of these lagoons can handle that much rain, wind, flooding and moving water. The surrounding fields have already been heavily sprayed with manure in anticipation of the impact and to reduce lagoon levels. There are 20 million gallons of waste water in a typical lagoon.

Computer models predict more 30 inches of rain in much of the hog-production concentration in the Cape Fear and Neuse river systems (see map above), a low-lying plain veined by brackish rivers and creeks with a propensity for escaping their banks.

Dead hogs killed by Hurricane Floyd

The end result will be a hell on earth wasteland. Two-thirds of all human sickness originates from animal waste. Once microbes are released in to the air, soil and water, they are extremely difficult to get rid of. Conditions in the Cape Fear and Neuse regions will be very hazardous.

If influenza breaks out, the larger towns and cities nearby — such as Wilmington with 107, 000, Lumberton with 22,000, Fayetteville with 200,000, Goldsboro with 36,000 and Jacksonville with 70,000, Greenvile 92,000) — (although not as directly impacted by animal waste) will have their own sets of post-storm sanitation, electricity and water supply and waste challenges.

Many people have developed antibiotic resistance and have rundown immune systems from opiate use, etc. This is going to be a major test of the immune conditions of the people in the region. Additionally it is a given that the US is ruled by a kakistocracy and such as disaster is an invitation for them “to make shit happen.” The combinations could be a serious die-off or megadeath pandemic emanating from these hurricane flooded factory farms and the environmental conditions.

Beware of the annoucement of a hyped new false flag disease out of this. Any illness from this contamination will be standard and historic fare- disease that has been around for centuries.

For our friends living in the Carolinas, you might consider clearing out of Dodge for an extended period, if possible.

In addition, the Environmental Protection Agency said Tuesday that it would be monitoring nine toxic waste cleanup sites near the Carolina coast for potential flooding. More than a dozen such Superfund sites in and around Houston flooded last year in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, with spills of potentially hazardous materials reported at two.

Complicating matters are the Brunswick plant’s two nuclear reactors right on the coast at Wilmington. They are of the same design as those in Fukushima, Japan, that exploded and leaked radiation following a 2011 earthquake and tsunami. Emergency plan now calls for installing nine temporary flood barriers in advance of a hurricane, to compensate for deficiencies in the original design.

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